Wanderlust Part 3: Contentment in the Wandering

This is part three of a smallish series about living out your story. My story happens to include living overseas and traveling a lot, but it’s really about the bigger picture; about contentment, acceptance and taking our deepest desires and fashioning a life out of them.


If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you know that in the last ten years we have moved from PA to London to NJ to Zurich. That’s not considered a lot of moving among most expat circles, but for a risk averse person such as myself it is enough.

Each move has come with it’s own set of challenges, which I refer to collectively as ‘Kimberly’. I tend towards over-dramatization. And an ungrateful spirit. And did I mention I’m risk averse? What all of these character flaws amount to is discontent, and discontent will literally destroy the ability to live out your story. Or in this case, my story.

The truth is that living out our story is messy and unpredictable. It is challenging, it has unexpected twists, and it probably doesn’t look anything like we think it should. I spent two years living in London before I emotionally committed to my life there. I then fought, rather bitterly, against our move to New Jersey. I cried about the location, the house, and the church. I perked up a bit when I discovered the joy that is Target, but it wasn’t all sparkles and rainbows.

It was in that place, one I considered completely lacking in interest, beauty or excitement, that I began to learn what it means to be content in all situations. Contentment is seeing each moment, each small handful of wildflowers, each sunny day or short line at the grocery store, each breath as a gift. They are all gifts, whether or not they take place in New Jersey or Zurich or the place that you call home.

I have good days and bad. I still on occasion have buyer’s remorse over our decision to move overseas again. But I am content. Content to take each day as the gift that it is.

Kimberly

PS This was supposed to post days ago, but both blogger and my internet service have been down.

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  • I think Ann Voskamp’s One Thousand Gifts is a good reminder to embrace the wonder of each moment, whether gratefully thanking the Lord for the angle of the sun streaking through a western window at end of day onto a pile of LEGOs on the front room carpet, or for the same sun warming the sidewalk in front of a Paris cafe.